Cozy Comforters in Bright Colors – Bring Solace on Drab Late Winter Days

Can anyone help? Google is failing me this morning.

This photo of a comforter in a local vintage store triggered memories of the comforters that sat on a closet shelf in our home when I was a child. My mother told me my grandmother made them years before, but I can’t recall the construction method she described for sure.

I think they were stuffed with shreds of old rags, but I’m not certain I remember correctly. They had little strings tied in the centers of the squares as in this photo, presumably to hold the layers stably together.

Online searches don’t bring up anything specific to this type of construction.

If anyone know for certain how these old comforters were put together please share your knowledge in the comments section.

However they were made, there have been a lot of days lately when all I wanted to do was curl up under one with a good book, like my latest favorite read, Overkilt, by Kaitlyn Dunnett.

Beautiful Blue Wine Glasses – Great for Winter Desserts Too

Not a fan of wine? These blue works of glass artistry could show off a special dessert too. What about a parfait, a trifle, or just plain pudding or jello?

Nothing wrong with simple treats like we enjoyed back in the days of childhood – in a perhaps unconventional, but lovely, still, presentation. Something special on a wintry evening, a cooling refreshment on the warm summer days we hope will arrive before too long.

A Cup of Tea in January (2021)

It’s not yet time to hold tea parties with invited guests, but how about a cup of tea to make the moment special while enjoying a telephone visit?

Perhaps indulging in a good brew while reading a book would be nice, or while simply relaxing in a window seat, if you’re lucky enough to live in a vintage house?

It’s a drink with quite a long history, loved by those who treasure tradition; who believe in the power of its properties to heal our ills and bring civility. Two goals we much achieve in the coming year.

Bachelor Buttons Matted Within a Sky Blue Frame

January calls for lovely images of summer. This second hand store find features one of my favorite flowers, bordered with pale blue resembling a fair summer sky.

Before I know it, I will be on my back in the grass, gazing at eye level blossoms like these. Something to focus upon, to quell anxious moments when weather forecasts include snow and ice.

Here’s how to grow these flowers next summer if you’re interested. Here’s one version of how to paint them – but I created prettier ones, if I do say so myself, a few years ago when I copied a printed design from a vintage plate.

This post includes some interesting theories regarding how bachelor’s buttons, also known as cornflowers, got their name(s).

A Hope for Peace and a Unique Arrangement

This thrift shop find is whimsically inspirational. A reminder we can make great artistry from inexpensive found objects. Such fun to browse secondhand shops and view the unique ways merchandise can be displayed.

Just remember to wear a mask and keep your distance as you seek cheer and support local businesses these winter days – so stores can stay open safely.

The dove and the upward reaching display behind it seems symbolic of our hope for a more peaceful and positive 2021.

Celebrate the New Year’s Debut but Do So Safely

Many of us are anxious to turn over the last calendar page of 2020 in the hope that 2021 will be more peaceful and safe for everyone. Let’s not let our enthusiasm create a hazard. Celebrate at a distance and don’t overindulge.

Love this vintage display of glasses, a reminder of mid-twentieth-century hospitality.

Lovely Goldenrod Gets a Bad Rap

Of all the wildflowers of fall, goldenrod gets my vote as one of the loveliest. After all it was chosen as the brand symbol for Goldenrod tablets. (As the writer in the linked post notes, it’s difficult to find information on these tablets used by many children throughout the twentieth-century. – I learned of them from my parents, and I have seen one personally.)

In later years, when, for whatever reason, allergies became an epidemic, sufferers steered clear of goldenrod, considering it a trigger for symptoms.

Modern day research proved ragweed, a plant that blooms during the same season as goldenrod was the real culprit.

Here’s a guide for telling them apart from Clemson Cooperative Extension Home and Garden Information Center.

This Cool Vintage Custom Rat Rod Made My Morning

When I pulled into the post office parking lot, one Friday morning this past spring, this cool truck was right behind me. The care that went into its customization was evident, though some may call it a rust bucket.

I love the individuality expressed by its owner, who was quiet polite, holding the door for me in a debonair manner, his appearance resembling the truck.

What? No Prize? Sadly, Red Rose Tea Has Modernized

What a disappointment when I opened the box. The little white ceramic prize we used to find wasn’t there. At first I thought they just missed this box, but there wasn’t the usual notice on the top, letting shoppers know this great, tasty, basic black tea also offered a bonus gift.

Apparently some accountant decided the company needed the small amount of money it cost to give customers a bright spot in an otherwise mundane day was too costly to the company.

Like so many other little perks that gave me an inexpensive pick me up, I’ll have to adjust, it seems to the disappearance of the Red Rose prize.

What the Heck are Antique Pockets?

 

Can’t believe I’ve never heard of them. Learned of this fairly common item used by our multi-great grandmothers through Thread on Arrival, A Mainely Needlepoint Mystery by Lea Wait.

Apparently in the seventeenth and eighteenth centuries, women and girls didn’t have pockets sewn into their skirts. Rather, an invisible slit was sewn into the skirts, camouflaged behind a pleat.

The ladies could reach a hand through the slit to access items stored in a pouch tied around their waist with a thin strip of fabric. Some of the pouches had drawstring tops, some were embroidered.

Women who were less well-off generally had plain pockets which were lost over time. Some of the embroidered ones owned by wealthier women remain, and are cherished, collectible antiques.